ANDI TERAN  Photos by: Lauren Pisano         Introducing Andi Teran: writer, performer, artist, mother. Andi has not only an extraordinary way with words, but an ability to seamlessly juggle her life and work that's beyond envious, with a winning collection of books to boot. She's recently released her debut fiction novel,   Ana of California  , a modernization of  Anne of Green Gables ; published by Penguin, which lucky for us readers pulls her talents beyond her usual writing for major publications, notably: Vanity Fair, MTV, New York, and Monocle. Also recently published is Andi's rescue cat Alfie, who is the cover page of Japan's Mill Mag.                           GAL:    What was the name of the first book you fell in love with, that turned you into a life long reader?     AT:   I’d say it’s a three-way tie between Judy Blume’s  Are You There God It’s Me Margaret? , Roald Dahl’s  James and the Giant Peach , and Louisa May Alcott’s  Little Women . I love stories about orphans or awkward youths going through major life changes.                              GAL:    What is the power of story? Describe some ways in which fictional narratives have impacted you and your life.     AT:   Fictional narratives are the reason why I’m a writer. I fell in love with books from an early age and grew up with parents who were both book collectors. Books were a part of our daily life. As an only child, stories entertained me most when I was lonely, and I often felt comforted by characters that would end up feeling like friends. To this day, I don’t think anything compares with getting lost within the pages of a book. To me, the best books—the ones you clutch to your chest once you’ve turned the last page—are both life-affirming and life-changing. They stay with you forever. I’ve always had a desire to write because I’ve always had a passion for reading. Being a writer feels natural to me.                 

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                     

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


         GAL:  How often do you read?      AT:   I read every day—which is becoming increasingly difficult with a newborn baby—but I currently average a couple hours a week. Pre-baby it was more like 7-10 hours a week.    GAL:  Do you have a current – or “forever” – favorite book?     AT:   My “forever” favorite books (I can’t pick one) tend to be about strong female characters—Harper Lee’s  To Kill a Mockingbird  and Charlotte Brontë’s  Jane Eyre  are top of the list.      

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                  GAL:    Who is your favorite author? (If impossible to choose please name two).     AT:   It’s impossible for me to name one favorite author but two of my all-time favorites are Haruki Murakami for his bizarre surrealist magic and Joan Didion for her elegant truth.    GAL:  Do you prefer non-fiction to fiction? If so, why?     AT:   Both! Great stories—real or imagined—transcend genres.    GAL:    If you read non-fiction, what genre do you prefer?     AT:   I love memoirs. Patti Smith’s  Just Kids  is one of my all-time favorites, and I just finished and thoroughly enjoyed  Girl in a Band  by Kim Gordon.    GAL:    How do you choose the books you read?     AT:   I have a massive list that I’m always going back to, but most of the books I end up reading are recommendations. I’m also in a fantastic book group full of lively, outspoken women with a passion for great literature. We’re currently reading Miranda July’s  The First Bad Man .        

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                  

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                           GAL:  We have a friend who has a “Sanity Shelf” dedicated to books she returns to again and again, to reread for pleasure, knowledge, and solace. What books would be on your Sanity Shelf?     AT:   On Writing   by Stephen King   (aka the best book about writing)    Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers   by Leonard Koren    Dangerous Angels ,  the Weetzie Bat book series by Francesca Lia Block    Haiku Harvest  , a vintage Japanese haiku poetry book my husband gave to me    Tales of the City   series by Armistead Maupin    Slouching Towards Bethlehem   by Joan Didion    Bohemian Modern   by Barbara Bestor                        

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                     

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


         GAL:  Do you have a current favorite reading spot? Where is it?     AT:   I love to read on the couch in my writing studio. It’s a small, intimate room—an enclosed balcony—with a wall of windows, natural light, and my favorite books and objects occupying the rest of the space. I could stay in there all day.    GAL:  Or – can you read anywhere – place is not important?     AT:   I used to love reading on the subway when I lived in New York City. I also love reading on airplanes.        

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


            

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


            GAL:  Is it important for you to physically hold a book you read? Or can you read on a device with no problem and no impact on the experience?     AT:   Yes, I prefer to hold an actual book. I have no problem reading news and articles on a device, but there’s something about immersing myself into words printed on paper that seems to work better for my brain. I enjoy the scent of old books too.      

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                AT:   I’m Not Finished Yet        GAL:    If you were to write your memoir, what would you title it?                  

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


          GAL:  Please name three books you recommend reading, and the reasons for your choices.     AT:   Vapor   by Amanda Filipacchi is the one book I recommend the most. It’s a weird and wonderful love story between a lazy actress and a mysterious scientist that takes place in a mansion full of clouds. I have gigantic love for this book.       Pattern Recognition   by William Gibson is an incredible book that reads like a movie in your head. It centers around a strong female character that chases trends, Internet mysteries, and the truth behind her father’s disappearance on September 11 th . It’s such a fun read.         The Goldfinch     by Donna Tartt is my most recent favorite book. An epic pseudo-orphan tale told in modern day New York City, it has one of the best opening chapters of any book I’ve ever read. I still get chills when I think about it. I don’t want to give too much away, but don’t be daunted by its density—it pays off in the end. Donna Tartt is a masterful storyteller.                   

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                  

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


     

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


                

  
     
    
       
        
           
                
           
        

        

       
    
     
  


     all images courtesy of  Lauren Pisano . Please do not use them without her express permission.   View Andi’s work on her  website , her  Instagram , and also through  her new book !
 

ANDI TERAN

Photos by: Lauren Pisano

Introducing Andi Teran: writer, performer, artist, mother. Andi has not only an extraordinary way with words, but an ability to seamlessly juggle her life and work that's beyond envious, with a winning collection of books to boot. She's recently released her debut fiction novel, Ana of California, a modernization of Anne of Green Gables; published by Penguin, which lucky for us readers pulls her talents beyond her usual writing for major publications, notably: Vanity Fair, MTV, New York, and Monocle. Also recently published is Andi's rescue cat Alfie, who is the cover page of Japan's Mill Mag.

 
 

GAL: What was the name of the first book you fell in love with, that turned you into a life long reader?

AT: I’d say it’s a three-way tie between Judy Blume’s Are You There God It’s Me Margaret?, Roald Dahl’s James and the Giant Peach, and Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. I love stories about orphans or awkward youths going through major life changes.

 
 

GAL: What is the power of story? Describe some ways in which fictional narratives have impacted you and your life.

AT: Fictional narratives are the reason why I’m a writer. I fell in love with books from an early age and grew up with parents who were both book collectors. Books were a part of our daily life. As an only child, stories entertained me most when I was lonely, and I often felt comforted by characters that would end up feeling like friends. To this day, I don’t think anything compares with getting lost within the pages of a book. To me, the best books—the ones you clutch to your chest once you’ve turned the last page—are both life-affirming and life-changing. They stay with you forever. I’ve always had a desire to write because I’ve always had a passion for reading. Being a writer feels natural to me.

 
 
 

GAL: How often do you read? 

AT: I read every day—which is becoming increasingly difficult with a newborn baby—but I currently average a couple hours a week. Pre-baby it was more like 7-10 hours a week.

GAL: Do you have a current – or “forever” – favorite book?

AT: My “forever” favorite books (I can’t pick one) tend to be about strong female characters—Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre are top of the list.

 

GAL: Who is your favorite author? (If impossible to choose please name two).

AT: It’s impossible for me to name one favorite author but two of my all-time favorites are Haruki Murakami for his bizarre surrealist magic and Joan Didion for her elegant truth.

GAL: Do you prefer non-fiction to fiction? If so, why?

AT: Both! Great stories—real or imagined—transcend genres.

GAL: If you read non-fiction, what genre do you prefer?

AT: I love memoirs. Patti Smith’s Just Kids is one of my all-time favorites, and I just finished and thoroughly enjoyed Girl in a Band by Kim Gordon.

GAL: How do you choose the books you read?

AT: I have a massive list that I’m always going back to, but most of the books I end up reading are recommendations. I’m also in a fantastic book group full of lively, outspoken women with a passion for great literature. We’re currently reading Miranda July’s The First Bad Man.

20150822_GL004_anditeran__286.jpg
 
 
 

GAL: We have a friend who has a “Sanity Shelf” dedicated to books she returns to again and again, to reread for pleasure, knowledge, and solace. What books would be on your Sanity Shelf?

AT: On Writing by Stephen King (aka the best book about writing)

Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets & Philosophers by Leonard Koren

Dangerous Angels, the Weetzie Bat book series by Francesca Lia Block

Haiku Harvest, a vintage Japanese haiku poetry book my husband gave to me

Tales of the City series by Armistead Maupin

Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion

Bohemian Modern by Barbara Bestor

 
 
 
 

GAL: Do you have a current favorite reading spot? Where is it?

AT: I love to read on the couch in my writing studio. It’s a small, intimate room—an enclosed balcony—with a wall of windows, natural light, and my favorite books and objects occupying the rest of the space. I could stay in there all day.

GAL: Or – can you read anywhere – place is not important?

AT: I used to love reading on the subway when I lived in New York City. I also love reading on airplanes.

 
 

GAL: Is it important for you to physically hold a book you read? Or can you read on a device with no problem and no impact on the experience?

AT: Yes, I prefer to hold an actual book. I have no problem reading news and articles on a device, but there’s something about immersing myself into words printed on paper that seems to work better for my brain. I enjoy the scent of old books too.

 

AT: I’m Not Finished Yet

GAL: If you were to write your memoir, what would you title it?

 

 

GAL: Please name three books you recommend reading, and the reasons for your choices.

AT: Vapor by Amanda Filipacchi is the one book I recommend the most. It’s a weird and wonderful love story between a lazy actress and a mysterious scientist that takes place in a mansion full of clouds. I have gigantic love for this book.

 

Pattern Recognition by William Gibson is an incredible book that reads like a movie in your head. It centers around a strong female character that chases trends, Internet mysteries, and the truth behind her father’s disappearance on September 11th. It’s such a fun read.

 

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt is my most recent favorite book. An epic pseudo-orphan tale told in modern day New York City, it has one of the best opening chapters of any book I’ve ever read. I still get chills when I think about it. I don’t want to give too much away, but don’t be daunted by its density—it pays off in the end. Donna Tartt is a masterful storyteller.

 
 
 

all images courtesy of Lauren Pisano. Please do not use them without her express permission.

 View Andi’s work on her website, her Instagram, and also through her new book!